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A Birds of a Feather session (BOF) provides an environment for researchers and practitioners with similar interests to meet for informal discussions. Proposers of BOF sessions should serve as discussion leaders only. BOFs are not intended to be presentations. Each BOF should involve active participation for attendees and should be planned for a 50-minute session.

BoF proposals should include plans to facilitate active participation for attendees of diverse backgrounds. Proposers may find the following resources useful in identifying inclusive practices to include in the BOF activities:

Authors submitting work to SIGCSE TS 2024 are responsible for complying with all applicable conference authorship policies and those articulated by ACM. If you have questions about any of these policies, please contact program@sigcse2024.sigcse.org for clarification prior to submission.

New for 2024: BOF submissions now consist of responses to a series of prompts rather than a PDF submission.

New for 2024: ACM has made a commitment to collect ORCiD IDs from all published authors (https://authors.acm.org/author-resources/orcid-faqs). All authors on each submission must have an ORCiD ID (https://orcid.org/register) in order to complete the submission process. Please make sure to get your ORCID ID in advance of submitting your work.

Presentation Modality

SIGCSE TS 2024 will only include in-person BOFs.

By SIGCSE policy, ALL authors of an accepted accepted BOF are required to register, attend, and present the work.

Dates

This program is tentative and subject to change.

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Thu 21 Mar

Displayed time zone: Pacific Time (US & Canada) change

17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Sourcing Projects for CS Capstones: Challenges and Strategies
Birds of a Feather
Fisayo Omojokun Georgia Institute of Technology, Kellyann Fitzpatrick Georgia Institute of Technology
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Disability and Accessibility in Computer Science Education
Birds of a Feather
Richard Ladner University of Washington, Brianna Blaser University of Washington, Andreas Stefik University of Nevada at Las Vegas, USA, Amy Ko University of Washington, Raja Kushalnagar Gallaudet University
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Humanitarian Open Source in the Classroom
Birds of a Feather
Gregory W. Hislop Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA, Heidi J.C. Ellis Western New England University, Darci Burdge Nassau Community College, Cam Macdonell MacEwan University
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Building Community for Graduate Students in CS Education Research
Birds of a Feather
Tamara Nelson-Fromm University of Michigan, Grace Barkhuff Georgia Institute of Technology, Jayne Everson University of Washington, Morgan Fong University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Elijah Rivera Brown University
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Platform or Foundational Concept? Approaches to Teaching Modern Web Development
Birds of a Feather
Michael Stewart James Madison University, Michael Kirkpatrick James Madison University
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Creating university CS teacher preparation programs
Birds of a Feather
Michelle Friend University of Nebraska Omaha, Jennifer Rosato College of St. Scholastica, Nathan H. Bean Kansas State University, Russell Feldhausen Kansas State University, Joshua Weese Kansas State University
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Directing Undergraduate Studies: Sharing Practices and Problems
Birds of a Feather
Bill Siever Washington University in St. Louis
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Minority Service Institution Meet-UpMSI
Birds of a Feather
Jody Paul Metropolitan State University of Denver
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
BOF: Grading for Equity in Computer Science Courses
Birds of a Feather
David Largent Ball State University, Manuel A. Pérez-Quiñones University of North Carolina Charlotte, Christian Roberson Florida Southern College, Linda Wilson Texas Lutheran University, Adrienne Decker University at Buffalo, Stephen Edwards Virginia Tech
17:30 - 18:20
17:30
50m
Talk
Discussing the Changing Landscape of Generative AI in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Stephen MacNeil Temple University, Juho Leinonen Aalto University, Paul Denny The University of Auckland, Natalie Kiesler DIPF | Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education, Arto Hellas Aalto University, James Prather Abilene Christian University, Brett Becker University College Dublin, Michel Wermelinger The Open University, Karen Reid University of Toronto
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Computing as a University Graduation Requirement
Birds of a Feather
Zachary Dodds Harvey Mudd College, Yuan Garcia Mills High School, Vidushi Ojha University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mark Guzdial University of Michigan, Tamara Nelson-Fromm University of Michigan, Valerie Barr Bard College, Stephanos Matsumoto Olin College of Engineering
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Experiences With Computer-Based Testing (CBT)
Birds of a Feather
Armando Fox UC Berkeley, Dan Garcia UC Berkeley, Cinda Heeren University of British Columbia, Firas Moosvi University of British Columbia Okanagan, Mariana Silva University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Matthew West University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign , Craig Zilles University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
POGIL in Computer Science for Beginners and Experts
Birds of a Feather
Olga Glebova University of Connecticut, Helen Hu Westminster University, Kendra Walther University of Southern California
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
K-12 CS Teacher Education: What are we teaching and to whom? How do we know we are moving the needle?
Birds of a Feather
Charity Freeman University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Todd Lash University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Can We Build an Excellent Undergraduate TA Program? Fostering Collaboration and Developing Best Practices
Birds of a Feather
Melinda McDaniel Georgia Institute of Technology, Fisayo Omojokun Georgia Institute of Technology, Mary Hudachek-Buswell Georgia Institute of Technology
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Topics for an Introductory Data Science Course
Birds of a Feather
Michael Posner Villanova University, April Kerby-Helm Winona State University
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Teaching Ethics In CS Programs - Questions, Models, Resources, Assessments
Birds of a Feather
Vance Ricks Northeastern University, Meica Magnani Northeastern University, Casey Fiesler University of Colorado Boulder, Grace Barkhuff Georgia Institute of Technology, Stacy Doore Colby College, Alexi Brooks University of Wisconsin-Stout, Michael Zimmer Marquette University
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Mentoring, AI, and the End of Affirmative Action: Connecting with SIGCSE Reads
Birds of a Feather
Nanette Veilleux Simmons University, Rebecca Bates Minnesota State University, Mankato, Judy Goldsmith University of Kentucky, Valerie Summet Rollins College
18:30 - 19:20
18:30
50m
Talk
Cultivating and Celebrating LGBTQ+ Community in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Joslenne Peña Macalester College, Megumi Kivuva University of Washington, Seattle, Mara Kirdani-Ryan University of Washington, Francisco Castro New York University, Amy Ko University of Washington

Fri 22 Mar

Displayed time zone: Pacific Time (US & Canada) change

12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Integrating Computer Science in Elementary Education
Birds of a Feather
Lisa Garbrecht University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center, Stephanie N. Baker The University of Texas at Austin, Zhuoying Wang The University of Texas at Austin
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Engaging Rural Populations in Computer Science
Birds of a Feather
Nathan H. Bean Kansas State University, Russell Feldhausen Kansas State University, Joshua Weese Kansas State University, Michelle Friend University of Nebraska Omaha
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Connecting the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) Western Chapters
Birds of a Feather
Lauren Bricker University of Washington, Randy Macdonald Corvallis High School, Sean Glantz CSTA/Bend Senior High School
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Finding Neurodivergent Community in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Mara Kirdani-Ryan University of Washington, Omar Ibrahim University of Illinois Chicago
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Community-based Service Learning: Best Practices in Software Projects with Community Partners
Birds of a Feather
Michael Goldweber Denison University, Stan Kurkovsky Central Connecticut State University, Chad Williams Central Connecticut State University, Nathan Sommer Xavier University
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Two-Year Program Conversations: Supporting a Diversity of Students, Articulation Pathways, and More
Birds of a Feather
William Kerney , Laura Malave St. Petersburg Community College, William Pulling Fanshawe College, Cara Tang Portland Community College
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Computing, Education, and Capitalism
Birds of a Feather
Amy Ko University of Washington, Francisco Castro New York University, Aakash Gautam University of Pittsburgh, Anne Drew Hu Michigan State University, Sara Kingsley Carnegie Mellon University, Michael Lachney Michigan State University, Aman Yadav Michigan State University
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
BOF: Hispanics in ComputingMSI
Birds of a Feather
Brianna Posadas Virginia Tech, Oscar Veliz Northeastern University, Patricia Ordóñez University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Manuel A. Pérez-Quiñones University of North Carolina Charlotte
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Primarily Undergraduate Institution Faculty
Birds of a Feather
Victoria Dean Olin College of Engineering, Lynn Kirabo Harvey Mudd College, Sophia Krause-Levy University of San Diego, Cynthia Taylor Oberlin College
12:45 - 13:35
12:45
50m
Talk
Teaching Track Faculty in Computer Science
Birds of a Feather
Laney Strange Northeastern University, Olga Glebova University of Connecticut, Melinda McDaniel Georgia Institute of Technology, Chris Gregg Stanford University

Accepted Submissions

Title
A Town Meeting: SIGCSE Committee on Expanding the Women-in-Computing Community
Birds of a Feather
Birds of a Feather Who'd Like to Share Software Together: Teaching Tools that Improve Efficiency and Outcomes
Birds of a Feather
BOF: Grading for Equity in Computer Science Courses
Birds of a Feather
BOF: Hispanics in ComputingMSI
Birds of a Feather
Building Community for Graduate Students in CS Education Research
Birds of a Feather
Can We Build an Excellent Undergraduate TA Program? Fostering Collaboration and Developing Best Practices
Birds of a Feather
Community-based Service Learning: Best Practices in Software Projects with Community Partners
Birds of a Feather
Computing as a University Graduation Requirement
Birds of a Feather
Computing, Education, and Capitalism
Birds of a Feather
Connecting the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) Western Chapters
Birds of a Feather
Creating university CS teacher preparation programs
Birds of a Feather
Cultivating and Celebrating LGBTQ+ Community in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Directing Undergraduate Studies: Sharing Practices and Problems
Birds of a Feather
Disability and Accessibility in Computer Science Education
Birds of a Feather
Discussing the Changing Landscape of Generative AI in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Engaging Rural Populations in Computer Science
Birds of a Feather
Equity and Inclusion Considerations in CS Education for Students Living with Mental Health and Medical Conditions
Birds of a Feather
Experiences With Computer-Based Testing (CBT)
Birds of a Feather
Finding Neurodivergent Community in Computing Education
Birds of a Feather
Humanitarian Open Source in the Classroom
Birds of a Feather
Integrating Computer Science in Elementary Education
Birds of a Feather
K-12 CS Teacher Education: What are we teaching and to whom? How do we know we are moving the needle?
Birds of a Feather
Mentoring, AI, and the End of Affirmative Action: Connecting with SIGCSE Reads
Birds of a Feather
Minority Service Institution Meet-UpMSI
Birds of a Feather
Platform or Foundational Concept? Approaches to Teaching Modern Web Development
Birds of a Feather
POGIL in Computer Science for Beginners and Experts
Birds of a Feather
Primarily Undergraduate Institution Faculty
Birds of a Feather
Sourcing Projects for CS Capstones: Challenges and Strategies
Birds of a Feather
Teaching Ethics In CS Programs - Questions, Models, Resources, Assessments
Birds of a Feather
Teaching Track Faculty in Computer Science
Birds of a Feather
Topics for an Introductory Data Science Course
Birds of a Feather
Two-Year Program Conversations: Supporting a Diversity of Students, Articulation Pathways, and More
Birds of a Feather

Deadlines and Submission

BOF submissions consist of answers to a series of prompts, including an abstract that introduces the topic, further analysis of the relevance of the topic, a consideration of the likely audience for the session, a description of the form and structure of the BoF, and an indication of the expertise of the session leaders.

BOF submissions to the SIGCSE TS 2024 must be made through EasyChair no later than Friday, 14 October 2023. The track chairs reserve the right to desk reject submissions that are incomplete after the deadline has passed.

Important Dates

Due Date Friday, 13 October 2023
Due Time 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12h)
Submission Limits 2 pages
Notification to Authors    Monday, 13 November 2023 tentative
Submission Link https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sigcsets2024
Session Duration 50 minutes

Authors may find it useful to read the Instruction for Reviewers and the Review Form to understand how their submissions will be reviewed. Also note that when submitting, you will need to provide between 3-7 related topics from the Topics list under Info.

Submissions

All BoF submissions for SIGCSE TS 2024 will be done using a form on EasyChair. In addition to providing answers to the standard information (e.g., authors, ACM policy confirmations, topic selections, keywords), authors are asked to respond to the following questions. For each section (except the abstract), you may include references inline.

Abstract: Please prepare an abstract of up to 250 words. This abstract will appear in the online program and in the conference proceedings. Abstracts should not contain subheadings or citations.

Significance and Relevance: Please include information about any trends in relation to the topic and possibly describe (or cite) evidence to that effect. Your objective here is to explain why the topic is significant. You should also justify how your BOF session will enhance future connections between attendees. This information can help your proposal to be selected if resources become an issue.

Expected (and Unexpected) Audience: Briefly describe the nature and size of the expected audience. Please explain how you will ensure that the BOF remains an inclusive space for all attendees, including attendees with different backgrounds or perspectives. If you expect a particularly large or small audience, please explain why. If you have a rough estimate of attendees based on previous years, please include it here to help assist with room scheduling.

Background and Expertise of Discussion Leader(s): Give a summary of the qualifications of the discussion leader(s) as it relates to the proposed BoF session.

Structure and Activities: Provide a brief description of the structure and activities planned for the BoF session. Proposals will be assessed on their potential to (1) facilitate active participation from attendees and (2) include attendees with diverse social identities and experiences.

We strongly recommend that you prepare this information in a separate document and then copy and paste into EasyChair. EasyChair has been known to time out.

Accessibility

SIGCSE TS 2024 authors are strongly encouraged to prepare their submissions in such a manner that the content is widely accessible to potential reviewers, track chairs, and readers. Please see these resources for preparing an accessible submission.

Single Anonymized Review

Submissions to the BOF track are reviewed with the single-anonymous review process. Submissions should include author names and affiliations. Thus, the author identities are known to reviewers, but reviewers are anonymous to each other and to the authors.

The reviewing process includes a discussion phase after initial reviews have been posted. During this time, the reviewers can examine all reviews and privately discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the work in an anonymous manner through EasyChair. This discussion information can be used by the track chairs in addition to the content of the review in making final acceptance decisions.

The SIGCSE TS 2024 review process does not have a rebuttal period for authors to respond to comments, and all acceptance decisions are final.

ACM Policies

By submitting your article to an ACM Publication, you are hereby acknowledging that you and your co-authors are subject to all ACM Publications Policies, including ACM’s new Publications Policy on Research Involving Human Participants and Subjects (https://www.acm.org/publications/policies/research-involving-human-participants-and-subjects). Alleged violations of this policy or any ACM Publications Policy will be investigated by ACM and may result in a full retraction of your paper, in addition to other potential penalties, as per ACM Publications Policy.

ORCiD ID

ACM has made a commitment to collect ORCiD IDs from all published authors (https://authors.acm.org/author-resources/orcid-faqs). All authors on each submission must have an ORCiD ID (https://orcid.org/register) in order to complete the submission process. Please make sure to get your ORCID ID in advance of submitting your work.

Additional details are in the instructions for authors.

  • Make sure that all authors have obtained an ORCiD identifier. These identifiers are required for paper submission.
  • Identify at least one author who is willing to review for the symposium. Have that author or those authors sign up to review at https://bit.ly/review-SIGCSE2024. (If they’ve done so already, there is no need to fill out the form a second time.)
  • Review the additional resources for the track.
  • Review the instructions for reviewers and the review form to see what reviewers will be looking for in your submission.
  • Look at the EasyChair submission page to make sure you’ll be prepared to fill everything out. Note that you are permitted to update your submission until the deadline, so it is fine to put draft information there as you get ready.
  • Look at the list of topics in the Info menu on this site or on EasyChair and pick 3-7 appropriate topics for your submission.
  • Prepare the longer responses in a separate document. (EasyChair is known to time out, so you will want to copy and paste into EasyChair.) These include
    • The abstract
    • A discussion of the significance and relevance of the topic
    • A discussion of the expected audience and how you will ensure that the BoF is appropriately inclusive
    • A discussion of the background and expertise of the discussion leader(s)
    • A discussion of the structure and activities in the BoF
  • Submit your answers on EasyChair by 11:59 p.m. AoE, Friday, 13 October 2023.

What Gets Published?

The full text of accepted BOF submissions will not appear in the ACM digital library. Only the title, author metadata, and the 250-word abstract will be included in the official conference proceedings.

Presentation Details

SIGCSE TS 2024 will only include in-person BOFs.

By SIGCSE policy, ALL authors of an accepted accepted BOF are required to register, attend, and present the work.

Further details about post-acceptance processes and presentation logistics will be provided by the time acceptance decisions are sent out.

Language Editing Assistance

ACM has partnered with International Science Editing (ISE) to provide language editing services to ACM authors. ISE offers a comprehensive range of services for authors including standard and premium English language editing, as well as illustration and translation services. Editing services are at author expense and do not guarantee publication of a manuscript.

Reviewing Phase Start Date End Date
Reviewing Saturday,14 October 2023   Sunday, 29 October 203
Discussion & Recommendations   Monday, 30 October 2023   Friday, 3 November 2023

Table of Contents

Overview

Birds-of-a-Feather sessions provide an environment for colleagues with similar interests to meet for informal discussion. Proposers of BOF sessions should serve as discussion leaders only. BOFs are not intended to be presentations.

Submission and Review System

The review process for SIGCSE TS 2024 will be done using the EasyChair submission system (https://easychair.org/my/conference?conf=sigcsets2024). Reviewers will be invited to join/login into EasyChair, update their profile, and select 3-5 topics that they are most qualified to review. To do so, reviewers select SIGCSE TS 2024 > Conference > My topics from the menu and select at most 5 topics. More topics make it harder for the EasyChair system to make a good set of matches. Reviewers also identify their Conflicts of Interest by selecting SIGCSE TS 2024 > Conference > My Conflicts.

Single-Anonymous Review Process

Submissions to the BOF track are reviewed with the single-anonymous review process. Submissions should include author names and affiliations. Thus, the author identities are known to reviewers, but reviewers are anonymous to each other and to the authors.

The reviewing process includes a discussion phase after initial reviews have been posted. During this time, the reviewers can examine all reviews and privately discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the work in an anonymous manner through EasyChair. Reviewers can refer to each other by their reviewer number on that submission’s review. This discussion information can be used by the track chairs in addition to the content of the review in making final acceptance decisions.

The SIGCSE TS 2024 review process does not have a rebuttal period for authors to respond to comments, and all acceptance decisions are final.

Getting Started Reviewing

Before starting your review, you may be asked by the Track Chairs to declare conflicts with any submitting authors. Please do so in a timely manner so we can avoid conflicts during the assignment of submissions.

As a Reviewer, we ask that you carefully read each submission assigned to you and write a constructive review that concisely summarizes what you believe the submission to be about. When reviewing a submission, consider:

  • the strengths and weaknesses,
  • the contribution to an outstanding SIGCSE TS 2024 program and experience for attendees, and
  • how it brings new ideas or extends current ideas through replication to the field and to practitioners and researchers of computing education.

BOF Review Guidelines

In your review, you will be asked five questions.

Summary. Please provide a brief summary of the submission, its audience, and its main point(s).

Plans to facilitate active participation. How does the proposal indicate plans to facilitate active participation from attendees?

Plans to include attendees with diverse social identities and experiences. How does the proposal indicate what steps it will take to make the BoF session an inclusive space for all attendees including attendees that the authors did not expect?

Recommendation. Please provide a detailed justification that includes constructive feedback that summarizes the strengths & weaknesses of the submission and clarifies your scores. Both the score and the review text are required, but remember that the authors will not see the overall recommendation (only your review text). You should NOT directly include your preference for acceptance or rejection in your review.

Confidential remarks for the program committee. If you wish to add any remarks intended only for PC members please write them below. These remarks will only be seen by the PC members having access to reviews for this submission. They will not be sent to the authors. This field is optional.

We strongly recommend that you prepare your review in a separate document; EasyChair has been known to time out.

In your recommendation, please consider the following questions:

  • How does the session strengthen an existing community or form a new community?
  • How does the session benefit from the discussion-oriented birds of a feather format as opposed to a panel, special session, or paper presentation?
  • How does the session provide an affinity space where all participants can share and learn from each other—not only from the discussion leaders?

While your review text should clearly support your scores and recommendation, please do not include your preference for acceptance or rejection of a submission in the feedback to the authors. Instead, use the provided radio buttons to make a recommendation (the authors will not see this) based on your summary review and provide any details that refer to your recommendation directly in the confidential comments to the APC or track chairs. Remember that as a reviewer, you will only see a small portion of the submissions, so one that you recommend for acceptance may be rejected when considering the other reviewer recommendations and the full set of submissions.

Discussion

The discussion and recommendation period provides the opportunity for the Track Chairs to discuss reviews and feedback so they can provide the best recommendation for acceptance or rejection to the Program Chairs and that the submission is given full consideration in the review process. We ask that Reviewers engage in discussion when prompted by other reviewers and the Track Chairs by using the Comments feature of EasyChair. During this period you will be able to revise your review based on the discussion, but you are not required to do so.

The Track Chairs will make a final recommendation to the Program Chairs from your feedback.

Recalcitrant Reviewers

Reviewers who don’t submit reviews, have reviews with limited constructive feedback, do not engage effectively in the discussion phase or submit inappropriate reviews will be removed from the reviewer list (as per SIGCSE policy). Recalcitrant reviewers will be informed of their removal from the reviewer list. Reviewers with repeated offenses (two within a three year period) will be removed from SIGCSE reviewing for three years.

The text of review form as of 1 July 2023 follows. It may change slightly as we get closer to the submission deadline.

Summary: Please provide a brief summary of the submission, its audience, and its main point(s).

Familiarity: Rate your personal familiarity with the topic area of this submission in relation to your research or practical experience.

Plans to Facilitate Active Participation: Please assess the plans to facilitate active participation. Please provide constructive feedback, particularly if you have concerns about the appropriateness of plans.

Plans to include attendees with diverse social identities and experiences: Please assess the steps and structures in the proposal to make the BoF session an inclusive space for all attendees, including attendees that the authors did not expect. Please provide constructive feedback, particularly if you have concerns about the appropriateness of plans.

Overall evaluation: Please provide a detailed justification that includes constructive feedback that summarizes the strengths & weaknesses of the submission and clarifies your scores. Both the score and the review text are required, but remember that the authors will not see the overall recommendation score (only your review text). You should NOT directly include your preference for acceptance or rejection in your review.

Questions? Use the SIGCSE TS Birds of a Feather contact form.